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, good night, america. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >> bret: japan deals with environmental crisis following the earthquake and tsunami. will potential nuclear disaster there affect growing reliance for energy over here? and republican leaders try to keep the members in line long enough to avoid a government shutdown. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm bret baier. japan is coping with multiple disasters tonight. the japanese prime minister says if the catastrophe unseen since the end of world war ii. millions of people have little or no food, water, or heat in the freezing temperatures. following friday's earthquake and tsunami. nearly 1900 are confirmed dead but estimates for a final tally run much higher, with thousands more missing. explosions and exposed fuel rods at nuclear facilities heightened fear of full-scale meltdown. correspondent adam housley is in japan tonight. >> fears of a worst case scenario grip a nation that's shaken and battered from friday's 9.0 earthquake, subsequent tsunami and continual aftershocks. n
>> jamie: at this hour we are getting word from japan there could be a third nuclear plant in trouble there. sources are saying that the american committee in japan is reporting update that the plan may have similar plants to explosion from yesterday, partial meltdown. keep it on fox. we'll send it to washington now have a good day. >> shannon: i'm shannon bream live in washington. we begin america's news headquarters with the fox news alert. japan is reeling from what he is calling the worst crisis since world war ii. the threat of nuclear disaster is growing as they try to avert multiple meltdown in nuclear reactors. thousands are dead from the earthquake and the tsunami it caused and more than a million people are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nucle
-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest rift between nuclear authorities in the united states and japan. the u.s. believes the situation there is far worse than the japanese counterparts concede. the rift has led to a mini exodus of americans and others within japan. let's go now to nbc's chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. authorities in japan have just announced they may be close to restoring power to a stricken reactor, that's reacto
you next fox news sunday. >> a fox urgent tsunami warning issued for japan. after a 6.5 magnitude earthquake has hit off shore. this coming from the japan meteorology agency, the tsunami could be 1.6 feet and as we know, the size is deceiving when it comes in and how the wave comes in and how much it can take when it goes back out. dominique dei-natale with the latest on this. >> reporter: harris, it happened just 30 minutes ago. the details we have at the off the coast, which is supposed to be fukushima nuclear plant having the problems from the results of the tsunami and earthquake. and taking the height, 1.6 as well, but it's not about the height of the wave it's actually the back distance of the wave, how high it is, and goes back, and the force that it will bring it it hits shore. we haven't had confirmation whether the tsunami has happened, but probably in at that area, as result of the march tsunami. the wave touched in and big enough (inaudible) it will just drag even more around and the recovery process going on up there, particularly difficult. and where the united stat
from the people of japan? the special comment coming up. >>> it's hard to believe, but with each passing hour the situation in japan is becoming more dire and dangerous. and today, this. another explosion rips through a nuclear containment building and this, the safety system at a third nuclear reactor within the stricken fukushima plant breaking down. the reactor's fuel rods exposed for more than two hours. and officials seem unable to determine just how much water remains, as they seek to prevent a full-scale meltdown. beyond the dangers surrounding nuclear plant, there's widespread suffering from sendai to tokyo. millions are facing a mull tide of challenge. officials struggling to balance rescue efforts to reach survivors, distribute aid and bury the dead. a thousand bodies washed ashore in the last few hours. search and rescue teams from some 13 countries have now converged on what will be a lengthy and complex operation. frantically working to find any survivors from the upgraded 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. in all, nearly 10,000 people have been rescued, while ten
'm harry smith. also tonight, one week after japan's earthquake and tsunami a big break for the engineers trying to prevent a nuclear meltdown. and kids from around america and haiti, too, do what they can to help the people of japan. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening, katie is on assignment. president obama delivered a warning today to libyan dictator moammar qaddafi: stop slaughtering your people or face military action. the united states will help enforce a no-fly zone approved last night by the u.n. security council, but no american ground troops will be sent to libya. french and british warplanes could be in the air over libya by tomorrow. hours after the u.n. resolution passed, the qaddafi regime declared a cease-fire, but his forces reportedly kept shelling two cities-- misurata and ajdabiya. and there are also reports that qaddafi's forces are headed toward benghazi, the rebels' capital. david martin at the pentagon begins our coverage. david, good evening. >> reporter:
. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebelss solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may
on the disaster in japan. ten days after those nuclear reactors were damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, a new setback today in the recovery operation. workers were forced again to evacuate when smoke was spotted coming from two of the reactors. the official death toll from the disaster now totals 8,800, nearly 13,000 are still missing. now there are concerns about radiation in japanese pots and in sea water near the plant. bill whitaker has the latest including details about the plant's spotty safety record. >> reporter: it's a sign this crisis is far from under control. ten days after the fukushima plant was knocked out by japan's massive earthquake and tsunami and once again reactor three is spewing smoke a few hours later white smoke from reactor two. it's a mysterious and serious setback, one that prompted workers to evacuate and once again stopped efforts to stabilize the plant. over the weekend, there had been some encouraging signs. plant operators had reconnected electric cables to all six reactors for the first time since the crisis began. and after days of firefighters dousing react
-- the struggle to contain stricken nuclear power plans. a new dawn in japan. new setback for a country desperately trying to regain control. [ man ] ♪ trouble ♪ trouble, trouble trouble, trouble ♪ ♪ trouble been doggin' my soul ♪ since the day i was born ♪ worry ♪ oh, worry, worry worry, worry ♪ [ announcer ] when it comes to things you care about, leave nothing to chance. travelers. take the scary out of life. how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange juice. thank you for joining
from japan's meltdown blows toward the u.s. and we are live inside the exclusion zone around chernobyl, still the site of the worst nuclear power plant. what it's like a quarter century later. >>> just moments ago libya's foreign minister said libya has decided to halt all military operations to "protect civilians" in line with the u.n. no-fly decision. they say the cease-fire will "take the country back to safety and ensure security for all libyans." we'll have much more on the u.n. decision, as well as libya's cease-fire declaration coming up this half-hour. >>> in japan, it is one week since the earthquake, then the tsunami which devastated the country's northeast. the death toll stands at 6,539. more than 10,000 people are still missing. >>> new video shows the extensive damage at the fukushima nuclear plant, multiple reactors now in danger of overheighting. one of the spent fuel pools may be even cracked. officials are considering burying the fuel rods in sand to prevent a wider catastrophe but the bigger dangerest may be at reactor three which contains plutonium. high intensity h
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
and frayed nerves. the latest from japan. how is the radiation in that country now different from what you absorb every day? and they put the squeeze on pro-democracy demonstrators and a look at where the obama administration stands. live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." i'm bret baier. the news from japan continues to be mostly bad. but there was a positive note today, as the owner of the crippled nuclear plant says the new power line is almost done that will enable the restart of electric powered pumps and possibly a solution to the overheating crisis. elevated radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower
of intervention? >>> and disaster in japan. exhausted engineers struggle to get power restored at the country's crippled nuclear reactors. in the hopes of avoiding a meltdown. meanwhile, high levels of radiation begin to show up in food in japan, as the country's prime minister urges his people to show courage in the wake of their unspeakable tragedy. we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march 19th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> new york city waking up to a sunny saturday morning. the last saturday before spring begins. welcome to "the early show." i'm rebecca jarvis. >> and i'm russ mitchell. two major stories to get to this morning. we begin with libya. this morning libyan forces loyal to moammar gadhafi entered the outskirts of benghazi in eastern libya. opposition forces shot down a warplane that was bombing the city. the warfare continues as the libyan government denies its forces atacked benghazi and said it is observing a cease-fire. president obama warned mr. gadhafi must -- >> let me be clear. these
that libya is sending gas prices to japan, americans are pessimistic about our economy. a new cnbc poll has 37%, more than a third now, say the economy will get worse in the next year. that is bad news. that's a 16-point rise in the bad news estimate since december. and the poll's all-time high we're really pessimistic about it now. >>> obviously the united states is pleased with yesterday's vote. it sent a strong message that needs to be heated. the efforts by the international community to come together to make clear to colonel gadhafi that he cannot continue violence against his own people. they cannot continue the attack that started out by peacefully demonstrating for changes that are within the right of any human being. >> well there you have it. secretary clinton. welcome back to hardball. secretary clinton today. what's next? the representative to the united nations, national securities reporter mark thompson. let me ask you -- i read two things at the same time. one through the united states through the president reading a particular u.n. resolution. we're going with a no-fly zone
next from the crisis in libya to japan, we will switch back to that big story. u.s. officials say the crisis in japan is worse than three mile island. category five. we will get to the latest to avertd a meltdown. castrol syntec has been reformulated for better performance under the hood. so we gave it a new name. castrol edge with syntec power technology. new name. better formula. it's more than just oil. it's liquid engineering. >>> welcome back to hardball. japan raised its rating to a five on a seven-point scale. the crisis now even surpassed three-mile island. that's the standard. there it is on the score on the grid. time is running out. workers raced to avoid a full-blown meltdown and more of the situation in the nuclear problem, the former senior nuclear power plant operator. and david albright, a former nuclears inspector and president for the institute of science international security. well, michael, let's go to the whole question. what does it mean to go to five? >> probably the more relevant point is is that it's a three-mile island. the real bottom line here is that
. frightening moments for some workers at that troubled nuclear power plant in japan. what made them flee for their lives. >>> searching for spring. unseasonably cold weather puts a chill on the cherry blossoms and many areas of this country. >>> and summer breeze. why it might be a whole lot easier to find a summer job in twlechbt. >>> good morning, everyone, i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sunday." let's get to what's happening right now beginning with new this morning. robert gates says the obama administration has no plans to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's somet
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
: now to japan. a u.n. expert says radiation continues to leak from those damaged nuclear reactors but progress is being made. all six reactors are now hooked up to power lines-- a step toward getting the cooling systems working once the electricity is turned on the number of workers at the plant is now up to a thousand. meanwhile, the official death toll from the earthquake and tsunami is approaching 10,000 with nearly 14,000 missing. more than a quarter million survivors have no homes or have been forced to leave them. from japan tonight, here's lucy craft. >> reporter: cardboard houses now home for thousands living on the floor of a sports arena outside tokyo. all survived the tsunami and quake only to be caught up in a radiation scare. this fifth grader says "we escaped to my school but when they said even that was not safe, we came here." natives of iwaki like to boast about its postcard scenery and mild climate. the now notorious fukushima nuclear plant only 30 miles away has triggered a mass exodus. "from all sides everyone kept telling us get out of here" says this beautici
the latest on the only confirmed american death in japan. >>> and thearents of a rutgers student who committed suicide after police say he was taunted for being gay don't want harsh punishment for those accused. >>> and could it be true? does cbs want charlie sheen back on his t ho >>anhepo enti's ltwnthela yi on to the streets of new york. what sent chris brown into a frenzy? >>> i'm tamron hall. the newsmation is following the latest developments in operation odyssey dawn in libya. crew members are back safe in american hands after the f-15e fighter jet crashed overnight. video of the wreckage. two airmen ejected after the plane developed mechanical problems. the fighter jet was on a strike mission against a libyan missile site. the on-scene commander of the international coalition for libya told a news conference, civilians are under attack by moammar gadhafi's forces in misratah and libya's third largest city. the admiral say the coalition is, quote, considering all objections but did not elaborate. among the coalition targets hit todayç libyan naval base in tripoli. lookin
nuear site in japan, the power has been restored. they warn it will take days and weeks before they can turn it on. >>> tim pawlenty explores a run in 2012. >>> four former president's together honors one, a rare washington tribute to bush. >>> they are trying to extend the no-fly zone west towards tripoli. jim maceda is live in the libyan capital. bring us up to date as to what happened overnight and this morning. >> reporter: well, yeah, there are a lot of moving parts right now, andrea. first of all, a little more detail on the f-15 crash. that occurred 24 miles east of benghazi. the two pilots are now in safe u.s. hands. that is a rebel controlled part of the country. all of the loyalists or the forces loyal to the regime pulled back from benghazi when the air strike started two days ago and are now about the new front line is about 80 miles south of benghazi. the plane shall as you mentioned, went down due to mechanical failure. it was not gunfire. the plane completely destroyed in the crash. the two pilots managed to pair shoot out. they landed in two separate fields. again, they
in japan. u.s. officials now say the nuclear crisis in japan is worse than three mile island. it's a category five. an we'll get to the latest in the effort to avoid a melt down. you're watching "hardball." >>> welcome back to "hardball." jan has raised its rating of that nuclear disaster to a level five on a seven-point scale and a former member of the nuclear regulatory commission from this country said the crisis surpassed three mile island. there it is on that grid. time is running out as workers feverishly race to prevent a full-blown meltdown and a nuclear chain reaction. more on the desperate situation. let's turn to mike it will freedlander, a former senior nuclear power plant operator and david albright, president of the institute for science and international security. well, mike, let's go to this whole question. what does it mean to go to five? >> well, probably the more relevant point is what does it mean to be similar to three mile island. the bottom line is we have a situation where the nuclear complex has been compromised as a result of a station blackout. the reac
america. >>> in japan, new problems at the country's crippled nuclear complex are overshadowing some success at cooling the plant's overheated reactors over the weekend. there had been some optimism. this morning, workers at the facility were evacuated after gray smoke rose from the spent storage pool at the plant's number three reactor. it development comes after officials said they had successfully restored water pumps to two other reactors, putting them under control in a state known as a cold shutdown. the crisis, far from over with the discovery of radiation-tainted vegetables and tap water adding to public fears about contaminated food and drink. all that as officials now predict the death toll there in japan will exceed 18,000 from the earthquake and tsunami that followed. the situation in japan has raised questions in the u.s. energy secretary steven chu weighed in on a controversial nuclear reactor in new york city. >> we'll have to look at weather the reactor should remain. again, i don't want to jump to some judgment about what we should do going forward. the nrc will be l
in japan where today a radiation misreading at the fukushima plant sparked panic as well as evacuation. officials are now calling it a big mistake. charles hadlock is covering the latest developments from nearby, a safe distance, we should note, in south korea. charles, that misreading sparked another evacuation at the plant earlier today. are workers back inside? what is the status at fukushima daiichi right now? >> reporter: well, it was a major miscalculation, peter. a worker was reading the gauges and misrepresented what he saw. he reported he saw a spike of radiation equal to 10 million times what is normal. that turned out to be a miscalculation, and the tokyo electric company, the operators of the fukushima plant, had to back off and say, wait a minute, that's a miscalculation. it's not that bad. it is bad but not that bad. now, how bad is it? well, that water, that pool of water that is around the four reactors there is so radioactive that some radiologists tell me that workers standing in the water for one hour is exposed to four times his annual amount of radiation. so is tha
since tuesday in libya could be released today if libyan officials are to be believed. >>> in japan today, the nuclear crisis is upgraded to level five as authorities try everything to avert a nuclear meltdown. the government now admits it is overwhelmed. >>> plus california lieutenant governor gavin newsom with us on his state's response to the quake and tsunami. >>> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama will be delivering a statement on libya at 2:00 eastern at the white house after meeting with top lawmakers in the situation room. it will be the president's first comments since the u.n. authorized military intervention late last night. france and britain are making plans to send their jets to the region. italy has made its bases available. nato is meeting today in brussels to determine if it will lead any military operations against gadhafi's forces. today secretary clinton said that the world had no threat but to threaten gadhafi to stop his brutal crackdown against the rebels and libyan civilians. nbc's jim maceda is live in tripoli. we've heard so m
they were threatened and abused by soldiers after they blundered into a army checkpoint. >>> and japan hopes to have one cooling system working tomorrow. >>> i'm very ron ka de la cruz, now back to "hardball." >>> back to "hardball." time for "the sideshow." first up donald trump's brand of foreign policy. screw them. here he is on fox yesterday. >> i think i probably have more experience than anybody, whether i sell them real estate for tremendous amounts of money, i've dealt with everybody. by the way, i could tell you something else. i dealt with gadhafi. >> what did you do? >> you*u)ied the lead. >> excuse me. i rented him a piece of land. he paid me more for one night than the land was worth for the whole year or for two years and then didn't let him use the land. >> was that over in new jersey. >> i don't want to use the word screwed, but i screwed him. that's what we should be doing. >> well it happened during a 2009 visit to the united nations. gadhafi pitched his tent on property owned by donald trump after a lot of noise about it trump had the tent removed. to hear him tell it he k
. appreciate your time. >>> in japan, a shortage of bottled water. a live report next. nobody in my family ever had a heart attack. if anything, i thought i'd get hit by a bus, but not a heart. all of a sudden, it's like an earthquake going off in your body. my doctor put me on an aspirin regimen to help protect my life. [ male announcer ] aspirin is not appropriate for everyone. so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. to my friends, i say, you know, check with your doctor, 'cause it can happen to anybody. [ male announcer ] be ready if a heart attack strikes. donate $5 to womenheart at iamproheart.com, and we'll send you this bayer aspirin pill tote. s it hit helps the lhe of companipanies like the she smallestt ofof startups.ups. th ththat lets yos your employeloy, pa and custcustomersvate and sharee so you can can unleash tsh the of your mor your peopleople. ou but your wrinkles don't. ♪ introducing neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair. it has the fastest retinol formula available. in fact, it's clinically proven to smooth wrinkles in just one week. so all you h
bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was actually on the outskirts of this city, but was not planning to come in. this after reports that the cease-fire was followed by heavier fire from khadafy's army against civilians and soldiers rebel fighters. we
the street in the arab world tonight. >>> plus the other huge story out of japan. the latest news from japan is not encouraging. smoke out of the two reactors forced workers out of the area today and now traces of radiation found in water, in sea water, and in food. and finally, you know things are getting bad for sarah palin when she criticized president obama in india over his handling of libya and gets bashed by conservatives for being out of her depth. conservatives mind you and being illiterate on foreign affairs. >>> we start with the war in libya. richa richard engel, the best in the business, joins us from tobruk. what is happening in this war? i can't ask a wider question, richard. what is going on in the war? are we going after gadhafi? what are we doing in this war exactly do we know? >> reporter: the rebels here think we are giving them unconditional military support. their only strategy seems to be allow the u.s. and other military powers to scorch the earth and destroy gadhafi's military so that they can make a very slow advance toward tripoli. they do see there was a humanitar
's happening. fallout, more traces of radiation found in america from that crippled nuclear plan in japan. is the threat to the u.s. and the world growing? murderous attacksing libyan forces answer president obama's address with a new round of attacks on civilians, according to the rebels. >>> and camelot, it's not. the new miniseries on jfk and jackie o., many historians say it's more fiction than fact. we speak to the producer 0 of the series ahead. >>> good afternoon. we begin with the disaster in japan where the prime minister says the country is in a stalts of maximum alert, this as the fukushima crisis worsens. japan officials have said they believe there's been a partial meltdown at three of the plants' six reactors, that's half. now today radioactive water has been discovered in the maintenance tunnel at the plant. in a a spatefrtepha fr l io ocns e nd ncte peltoeer he nnoced 2 etrothor nd, stonrm plonm seepifr the damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside the facility. plutonium is years. but so far, officials claim the levels found are not harmful to human health. meanw
,000 people there. meanwhile in japan, another set back in the effort to control the japanese doubled fukushima plant. there are high levels of radioactive elements in the water there. there is more efforts to pump fresh water in the reactor there. dominic? >>reporter: uma, that's right. u.s. forces and japan getting involved. the navy has two naval barges loaded with 550,000 gallons of fresh water to be pumped in the plant. they are making it up to deliver the water. the united states air force is using c130 to deliver 500 tons was freshh bottled water up to sendai, close to the plantt where there are difficulties getting uncontaminated supplies of water and helping out the public there. the air force based out of the air base west of tokyo, home to 306,000 servicemen who are caught up in this as much as the japanese citizens. >> japp -- japan is our ally and our home. when something happen to japan and we are able to help we are glad to. we raised our hands to say yes, we can help you out. >> the utilit company said the water is contained. but the government is not sure if they are
, a miracle rescue in japan. rescuers find two earthquake survivors nine days after that horrible earthquake and tsunami. also what u.c. berkeley scientists found after checking radiation levels in the air. >>> at last encouraging news about the crippled nuclear plant. japanese authorities just announced that two of the six units are now under control after the fuel storage pools have cooled down. there are new concerns about food and water safety, but first something uplifting. david wright shows us the rescue of two survivors more than a week after the massive earthquake hit. >> late today a dramatic bit of hopeful news, a miracle rescue. they freed an 80-year-old woman and grandson trapped since the tsunami. the two survived nine days eating yogurt from the fridge until the grandson stood on the rooftop. japanese coastguard released new video of the tsunami before it hit shore. as it passes right under the bow of coastguard cutter you get a sense of how enormous it is. on land they are still dealing with the damage from the tsunami. they eased pressure on the reactor but releasing steam b
about food coming from japan amidst its nuclear crisis. >>> and losing his cool. singer chris brown snaps after questions about his assault on former girlfriend rihanna. >>> good morning, everybody, i'm lynn berry. those stories and more are straight ahead. this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> we begin this morning with power struggle. a fourth day of allied strikes have damaged moammar gadhafi's air defense systems but so far the attacks have failed to cripple gadhafi's confidence or put an end to his assaults against civilian opponents. anti-aircraft fire streaked the sky last night over tripoli after a day of heavy fighting between rebels and gadhafi loyalists. despite some success in the south, the inexperienced rebels found themselves outgunned by government forces in the western city of misrata. to the east. gadhafi appeared on libyan television yesterday reportedly speaking from the same tripoli compound targeted by coalition missile strikes on sunday. ever defiant, gadhafi predicted, quote, we will win this battle. meanwhile president obama has cut short his tour of latin amer
in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in libya. we begin our coverage with cbs news correspondent mandy clark, who is in ajdabiya this morning. mandy, good to see you. >> good morning. well, the streets of ajdabiya are relatively quiet at the moment. b
concerns about drinking water in japan. the government warning radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant has made tap water unsafe for babies. the u.s. air force bringing in more supplies to help with recovery operations there. >> the military is -- we are here to try and help people. this is a national disaster. we are here to work with the japanese people to start reconstruction and get sendai and other parts of japan's feet on the ground again. bill: the american relief effort includes 13,000 personnel, 20 ships and 140 aircraft. k.t. macfarland said the u.s. military is the first responders to the world. we found that in japan. heather: in the state of nevada, it has the largest share of illegal workers in the country. it also has the highest unemployment rate at 14%. are the illegals making a bad situation worse? anita vogel is joining us from los angeles. tell us about this new report. >> reporter: good morning. it lists the top states with the highest share of illegal immigrants in the labor pool. you mentioned nevada was the number one state with a 10% share of illegal immi
talking about the japan on the effect but now we're adding libya. >> there are so many periods of unrest all over the world but right now, i think wall street is focused on libya. probably it would have ended up higher if we know what was going to happen because a lot of people were afraid to put their money in, not knowing what was going to be happening but it is taking oil off the market. a lot of times when oil is off the market, oil will go up and so will gas prices. what we can expect from wall street is a lot of volatility. we're not going to see up, up or down, down, there are lots of reasons we should take a correction. s&p 500 is well above since december. >> heather: when you see the markets fluctuate according to large events, whether they be domestic or international, what affect does it have if any when you have so many events at once going on? >> the markets are going to be leading indicator, to be a fortune teller in a sense, priced in all of these things. it has been much more reactive of late. but has taken a positive stance toward japan. pretty positive stance to libya.
and bradley manning to the obvious. japan. how officials there ignored alarms about the possibility of a massive quake setting off a nuclear crisis that go back years. are these black swans that keep befalling us truly as unforeseen as everyone would want us to believe? how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com. plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. >>> turning our attention to japan, setbacks at the fukushima nuclear plant there. smoke started rising from reactor three amid fresh concerns about food and water supplies in the area. residents being warned not to drink the tap water and the government has banned shipments of milk and spinach from the region after radiation was detected but could all of this have been prevented? this man had been warnin
into an end game that doesn't overcommit us when we're already committed now? we've got this crisis in japan we're trying to help with, etc. so we are stretched thin. >> reporter: general and michael, thank you very much. >> thanks, shannon. >>> well, a leading figure of the libyan opposition movement has released a statement praising coalition forces for military action against qaddafi's regime. ththe pribs's family prince's fd from libya after the coup said the international community should help libya move forward. he said the libyan people cry out to the world to champion their rally for freedom and democracy. steve harrigan and rick leventhal have been provided around the clock coverage. steve was on the air as air strikes hit the area. you can follow that and catch all the developments in libya as military action continues. just log onto foxnews.com. >>> well, a glimmer of hope in such a tragic story in japan. an 80-year-old woman and a teenage boy were rescued from the wreckage of a house in northeastern japan nine days after a devastating earthquake and tsunami. both of them were wea
evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an official say that the radiation in water at the plant went to 10 million levels, that would be a catastrophic meltdown scenario numbers. fortunately, it was nowhere near that. radiation levels in the water have spiked four
that have happened around the world, it is facing more conflict plus japan which may be the largest issue that we're facing. >> andrea, it is unbelievable. i repeated to him, the associated press lead, we were on the air doing wrap-up from his speech the other night and they obviously had this set to go. they hit send. and their lead contained the words president obama defended the first war launched on his watch. i left the interview and you've been around this so many times yourself, and i passed through what i called the machinery of the presidency. the security, the aides, there was the tall air force officer serving as the military de you look at his feet. there is theootbal all of the people flew in with him. he has these three plates, balancing on sticks right now. americans in uniform fighting on at least three fronts. that leaves out special forces that are dug into places we can't imagine. and it is quite a world view, i guess, and are we entering this period of kind of ad libbed on the fly foreign policy where these nations are changing in north africa and the middle east befor
ravaged nuclear plant in japan. earlier, workers at that site reported a massive spike in radioactive water in the cooling system. perhaps ten million times as higher than normal, but now plant operators conceding that extremely high reading was wrong. let's go to dominic streaming live from osaka, japan. >> reporter: gregg, they are having extreme problems with highly radioactive water at the four of six troubled reactors. this radioactive water has seeped into buildings around the reactors which is making the job more difficult. up until yesterday, which was sunday japan time for a monday morning, they were actually able to access certain parts and get close to the core as possible to. radioactive water spread to other parts. because workers can only go in for 15 minutes due to the health and safety levels it's making the job doubly difficult. they are not sure where the source has come from. is it the result of the water being sprayed in and actually diluted a lot of the other radioactive water? is it coming from somewhere? they don't know. until they can actually start to drain so
: u.s. navy is rushing to deliver fresh water to japan's damaged nuclear plant to replace the corrosive sea water to try to cool the overheated reashh. fear is the sea water could further compromise efforts to stabilize the reactors. all of this coming as another spike in radiation. japanese government spokesperson the efforts of plant's workers seem to be keeping from the situation getting worse but it's too soon to be optimistic. >> heather: tea party helped the republicans win the house but house speaker john boehner is feeling the heat from some in the tea party movement. tea party nation sounder, he is accusing the speaker of a breaking a pledge to slash spending so he is pushing for a primary opponent against boehner. here is managing editor of the hill. thank you for joining us. let's get off the top, judson phillips he as bull's-eye on the speaker of the house. he says he is a compromised too much when it comes to spending. in your opinion should speaker boehner be concerned and what sort of fracture is this creating on capitol hill? >> she going to win his next re
. appreciate it. >> you bet. >>> in japan, americas are being urged to get supplies of iodine tablets. the very latest on the dangerous nuclear reactors. a full update after this. [ male announcer ] this is charlie whose morning flight to london starts with arthritis pain... and a choice. take tylenol now, and maybe up to 8 in a day. or...choose aleve and 2 pills for a day free of pain. enjoy the flight. you struggle to control your blood sugar. you exercise and eat right, but your blood sugar may still be high, and you need extra help. ask your doctor about onglyza, a once daily medicine used with diet and exercise to control high blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. adding onglyza to your current oral medicine may help reduce after meal blood sugar spikes and may help reduce high morning blood sugar. [ male announcer ] onglyza should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. tell your doctor if you have a history or risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. onglyza has not been studied with insulin. using onglyza with medicines such as sulfonylureas may cause low blood sugar.
reactors at japan's krip crippled nuclear plant temperature. they say there is still a lot of work to be done before electricity can be turned on. emergency crews dumped 18 tons of seawater into a nearly boiling pool holding spent nuclear fuel. japan's nikkei market closed with more than a 4% gain today thanks to the good news at the power plant. the index is still 7% lower than its close the day the earthquake and tsunami hit. >>> crews recovered the body of taylor anderson, an american teaching english in miyagi, japan, believed to be the first american victim, the first known one of the quake and tsunami. they estimate miyagi prefecture lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan is live now in seoul, south of korea. what's the story now? what's the situation with fear and whether it is dissipating in that region? >> reporter: i think there is still a lot of fear, it depends on where you are. if you are talking in the north, you are still focused so much on the search and rescue effort. it is still officially search and rescue. they go through the rebel with sticks trying their best
unbelievable, this happening at once. historic moment with the vast uncertainties. >>> coming up, in japan, a frightening forecast for one of those damaged nuclear reactors. we'll go live to tokyo. >>> frightening news out of japan as it appears the nuclear core reactor number three may be leaking radioactive material. workers near the reactor detected radiation 10,000 times stronger than normal. savidge is in tokyo. what are you hearing? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, as you point out, the government greatly concerned about the, is that may be going on at reactor number three. we've got an image to show you. it's a graphic. basically here's the problem -- they think that the water levels with the radiation they found, 10,000 times, as you say, above normal in the case that this is perhaps a leak coming from the core of the reactor. that particular reactor of all six that are out there is the most dangerous because it has mixed fuel. it's the only one that does. a mixture of uranium and plutonium, that's very dangerous stuff. meanwhile, overnight, though, the government also said yo
unfolding, japan. there's new radiation showing up in food and water in the aftermath of the tsunami, the earthquake. much more of our coverage from japan. we'll have a live report and from libya when we come back. and here's what we did today: we put almost three million americans to work... ...adding nearly 400 billion dollars to the economy. generated over two and a half million kilowatts of electricity... ...enough energy to power a quarter of america. we gave your kids a cleaner ride to school. kept the lights on during a calm day at the wind farm. heated 57 million u.s. homes. simmered grandma's chicken noodle soup. melted tons of recycled glass. roasted millions of coffee beans. provided electricity for nearly 29 million home computers. heated your bathwater. cooked your takeout. lit your way home. we helped america import less of its energy. cleared the air by burning cleaner than other fuel sources, with less pollutants and no mercury. and tomorrow, we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. l
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